New exhibit opens at World Center for Birds of Prey

The new exhibit at the World Center for Birds of Prey tracks 45 years of successful raptor conservation from around the world. (Peregrine Fund photo)

BOISE, Idaho — The Peregrine Fund announced the opening of a new exhibit, Time Flies: The quest to save birds of prey, on June 2 at the Velma Morrison Interpretive Center located at the Wold Center for Birds of Prey headquarters south of Boise.

This timeline exhibit showcases the tremendous impact The Peregrine Fund has had on raptor species worldwide since founder Dr. Tom Cade began the organization in 1970. At its inception, the organizations focus was to save one species, the peregrine falcon.

Forty years ago, Dr. Tom Cade established the The Peregrine Fund and began its work with a simple mission to save the Peregrine Falcon from extinction. Today, the center work around the world, conserving birds of prey faced with habitat loss, poisoning, and other challenges. (Peregrine Fund photo)
It was 45 years ago that Dr. Tom Cade established The Peregrine Fund and began with a simple mission to save the Peregrine Falcon from extinction. Today, the center works around the world, protecting birds of prey faced from habitat loss, poisoning and other challenges. (Kate Davis photo)

Now, 45 years later, the World Center for Birds of Prey has expanded to handle more than 140 species of raptors throughout the world with an extremely high success rate. The accomplishments include removing the peregrine from the endangered species list in 1999, helping communities preserve fish eagles in Madagascar and the captive breeding of California condors and releasing them back into Arizona.

One of the most important features of this timeline exhibit actually isn’t there. At the end of the timeline is a marker for the Peregrine Fund’s 50th anniversary in 2020. A blank wall extends beyond the timeline and has been left bare to be filled with new accomplishments, discoveries and profiles of conservation heroes of the future.

The World Center believes it’s just as important to celebrate the future as it is to mark the past. This new exhibit helps show visitors how passionate and dedicated people can make a difference in this world by saving raptors and their habitats.

The Peregrine Fund’s Art Director, Amy Siedenstrang, designed the exhibit.

The new exhibit tracks the World Center for Birds of Prey back 45 years to its inception and looks forward to its 50th anniversary in 2020
The new exhibit tracks the World Center for Birds of Prey back 45 years to its inception and looks forward to its 50th anniversary in 2020. (Peregrine Fund photo)

This new exhibit opens Tuesday, June 2, 2015. The World Center for Birds of Prey is open 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday with the last admittance at 4:15 p.m. The Interpretive Trail closes at 4:45 p.m.

General Admission is $7, $6 for seniors (age 62 +), $5 for youth ages four to 16 and free to Peregrine Fund members and children under age 4.

The World Center for Birds of Prey is located at 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane in Boise. For more information please contact Erin Katzner at 208.362.8277 or email her at:  erinkatzner@peregrinefund.org.

Tom Cade at a hack site (Kate Davis Photo)

A hacking station (Above) is a training tool and technique that helps young falcons reach their hunting potential by giving them exercise and experience. This technique is used to prepare the falcons to become independent hunters. The sequence of the procedure includes captivity, releasing, flight and either the falcon will be recaptured for falconry or released into the wild. Generally, falconers agree that hacked falcons are better and more preferred in the field. Hacking is beneficial, not only for the falconers, but for the bird itself and the species; however, there are some criticism and restrictions that come along with this method. The photo show Dr. Tom Cade working a hacking station in the early years of the Peregrine Fund. (Peregrine Fund photo)